Walk the Wales Coast Path Trearddur Bay to Rhosneigr

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Further Information

Location Map

Recommended Maps:

Route Summary:

The southern end of Ynys Gybi and Anglesey’s West coast provides varied walking.

Distance: 26.2 km

Ascent: 255 m

Time: 7 hours

Calculate the time using Naismith’s Rule and factor in your own pace.

Start and Finish: Trearddur Bay to Rhosneigr

Facilities:

We recommend the White Eagle pub in Rhoscolyn while there are plenty of cafes to choose from at the walk’s end.

Check out the businesses nearby for more places to stay and drink.

Hazards:

Remember that we cannot outline every single hazard on a walk – it’s up to you to be safe and competent. Read up on Mountain Safety , Navigation and what equipment you’ll need.

Public Transport:

Traveline for UK Public Transport

Guidebooks:

Businesses  on this section of the Wales Coast Path: 

Walk the Wales Coast Path Trearddur Bay to Rhosneigr Details

The Wales Coast Path from Trearddur Bay to Rhosneigr completes the walk along Ynys Cybi, and brings us back onto the main island of Anglesey. This section is a variety of rocky coast, wide beaches and a couple of seaside resorts thrown in for good measure.

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From Trearddur Bay, the Wales Coast Path follows the rocky coast south with plenty of interest on the way. This includes the sandy coves at Porth Diana and Porth Castell. Further along you’ll spot the natural rock arches of Bwa Gwyn and Bwa Du. Bwa Gwyn is Welsh for White Arch, and as it consists of white quartzite it’s rather obvious why it’s been named. Bwa Du is a more regular arch, and probably named in contrast to it’s nonidentical twin.

Once past these landmarks, the path climbs gently to a high point of just over 60m at Rhoscolyn.  On the way, you’ll pass St Gwenfaen’s Well. This is an early medieval holy well which, if you add two white pebbles to its holy water, is reputed to cure mental illness. The church dedicated to St Gwenfaen can be found in nearby Rhoscolyn which is also called Llanwenfaen in her honour. One at the high point just beyond the well, you’ll come to the coastguard lookout. Once glance at the coast with it’s numerous rocky islands, and it’s clear why you need someone looking out over such treacherous waters. The islets of Ynys Gwylanod, Seagull Island, and their navigational beacon can be seen nearby.

Rhoscolyn has a scenic bay known as Borthwen, with a quieter sandy beach than those found further north on the island. From here the coast path continues towards the fine beach at Traeth Lydan which is worth spending some time at. The Wales Coast Path heads inland from here, and doesn’t return to the coast for another 4km or so just outside Four Mile Bridge as there’s just no access here and one of the paths followed is a ‘permissive’ path.

The village of Four Mile Bridge is so called as it is four miles from Holyhead on the original route onto the island that predates the Stanley Embankment crossed earlier on the Anglesey coast. The bridge here was in place by the 1530s and was the only crossing until the Stanley Embankment was built in the 1820s. The Welsh name of Pontrhydypont which is confusingly the bridge of the ford of the bridge, or some tautological name in that vein refers to the fact that this would have originally have been a ford used to cross from the main island to Ynys Cybi.

The Wales Coast Path crosses the Cymyran Strait at Four Mile Bridge and heads south along a confusing section that eventually finds you firmly back on the coast at Glan Rhyd Isaf. The route continues onto Traeth Cymyran which is next to RAF Valley. This is pure beach walking, and you’ll be shaking the sand out of your boots by the time you reach Rhosneigr. The southern end of Ynys Gybi that you were walking on a number of hours ago is literally a stone’s throw at Plas Cymyran.

Rhosneigr is a bustling seaside village with plenty of places to refuel, and of course the obligatory fish and chip shop or two!

Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts founded Walk Eryri in 2004, with the aim of providing routes that are off the beaten track. Walk Eryri is now part of Mud and Routes which continues to provide more off beat routes and walks in Snowdonia and beyond. Dave has been exploring the hills of Eryri for over thirty years, and is a qualified Mountain Leader.
Dave also established Walk up Snowdon, Walk up Scafell Pike and Walk up Ben Nevis just to mention a few.

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